Texas Conservation Corps Returns to Lake Amistad

AmeriCorps members from the Texas Conservation Corps program frequently help the National Park Service and their Exotic Plant Management Team in their quest to keep invasive species from dominating the landscape in our National Parks.  Here is the story from our recent trip to Lake Amistad.

The sky was dark and the wind howled as we, the red crew, loaded into our trusty AmeriCorps van and returned to the West Texas desert at Lake Amistad National Recreation Area, near Del Rio, Texas.  Here we would once again take up arms against a formidable enemy, giant cane (Arundo donax). Arundo, much like its look-a-like bamboo, is a tall rigid cane that is native to the Mediterranean, eastern and southeastern Asia. The plant was originally brought to the United States in the early 1800s for roofing material and as a form of erosion control but quickly spread across the south via ornamental yard plantings and the natural seed dispersal that followed. Arundo is also one of the fastest growing terrestrial plants in the world, able to grow nearly four inches a day under ideal conditions, which enables it to out shade native plant species. And unfortunately arundo does not serve as a food source or good nesting habitat for wildlife, thus resulting in vast swaths of low quality habitat in this desert landscape.

Our team’s weapons of choice for this epic battle were chainsaws, loppers, and brush cutters, which allowed us to cut the fiendish grass as low to the ground as possible. Our project partner, Pat Wharton of the National Park Service’s Exotic Plant Management Team (EPMT), will follow up to remove the young arundo shoots which will reappear in the coming months. According to Pat, that 1-2 punch has been the winning combination that has resulted in about an 80% reduction of arundo in the Rio Grande canyons were we were working.

Having (for the moment) defeated one invasive species, the fight quickly moved to the eradication of two other highly invasive species, tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca) and salt cedar (Tamarix spp.). Our new target site was along the banks of Lake Amistad, a reservoir that is split between the United States and Mexico; the name symbolizing friendship between our two countries.  Moving ever forward, we set to work chain sawing and lopping the out-of-place plants. Within several days we had cleared the entire area of tree tobacco and all of the larger salt cedar trees. As the brief moment of Texas summer returned to winter, our AmeriCorps team left the park ready for its own return to its original state, as high quality Rio Grande floodplain habitat on the edge of the Chihuahuan Desert.

 

Will Miedema, AmeriCorps Emergency Response Team Crew Member, Texas Conservation Corps

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